Millions of dollars in funding to put men in women’s restrooms

Originally posted at The Truth about Autogynephilia

Do you wonder who is funding all the insane promotion of transgender issues? I’m sure this barely scratches the surface. I have found a document called  “US Foundation Funding for Trans Communities,” published in February 2015  by “Funders for LGBTQ Issues.”

The document is very disturbing. It’s a good place to start in researching the recent socially-engineered “mainstreaming” of transgender delusion.

There is likely lots more money “hidden” in donations for various social service programs.

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Bathroom Laws: putting women and girls at risk

Originally posted on YouTube by Mancheeze

Grayson Perry: I’m all man

Originally published on The Times Magazine website

He stresses he is a transvestite, not transgender: he dresses up for sexual thrills. Transvestitism is bound up in his taste for fetish sex, PVC clobber and sadomasochism, which featured often in his early work. “The trans spectrum is a whole different thing. I wouldn’t particularly want to live full-time as a woman. It’d be such a fag for starters, the amount of preparation every day!” (It takes him 90 minutes to apply the wig, make-up and padding.) I say I don’t find being a woman nearly so onerous. I’m being facetious, but like many feminists, I’m weary of womanhood being defined as an elaborate façade: fancy nails, false eyelashes, lingerie, sparkly clothes, heels.

“Transvestites – I speak for my own community – are heavily invested in sexism,” he says. “You go to a transvestite gathering, you won’t see anybody in trousers. It’s a joke, you know: if one of the other transvestites regularly wears trousers, they go, ‘They’re going to have a sex change any minute.’ Because only real women wear trousers all the time.”

Yet no one is equal in their sexual fantasies. “At some level, everybody is either being bent over the desk or is bending someone else over a desk. They’re not saying, ‘Shall we get cat litter on the way home?’ while wearing matching fleeces. Although in reality that’s exactly what me and my wife are doing. We live functional lives with people we love and our sex life, all the exotic stuff, happens off stage. And it’s best kept that way.” His first date with his wife was at a fetish club, but now they’re more likely to be at home watching Gogglebox: “It’s so funny. And it can be very moving.”

But we live at a moment when sexual identity appears to be in flux. Perry thinks the transgender lobby “is a very vocal group. They punch above their weight. I do wonder why they are so angry.” Maybe because trans women almost always began as heterosexual men? Perry laughs. “Yes, so they have that entitlement. Yes, it could be.”

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A Moment of Clarity on Autogynephilia

Originally posted at My Path to Power

Men do not know and cannot know what it feels like to be a woman. Anything they come up with is, by definition, a man’s conception of the alleged feeling and not a woman’s reality.

Women don’t “feel like” women, for one thing.

There have been many times when my ex tried to “prove” that I identify as a woman because I wear eyeliner (infrequently, at that) or have been seen in a dress.

But the way that I “present” is merely in service to getting by in the world. I can assure you that if I lived on a desert island, or even in a commune populated by women only, I would never send a blazer to a dry cleaner again.

Every person dresses to get by in the world, even as one person’s assessment of how to best do that differs from another’s. People wear clothes for reasons, whether those clothes are typical or atypical for their sex.

What would be the point in dressing in a way other than in service to one’s goals or comfort?

Why wear a space suit on a date? Or a bikini to a welding job? Or cuff links to a mud wrestling match?

What does it mean when a man dresses in a way that actually sabotages his goals?

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The Adult Baby Story

Originally posted at Words by Maria Catt

How different does the daily narrative you are building in your head have to be from the narrative the world is witnessing before it’s a problem? The party line seems to be that people’s personal narratives have a sacredness about them. Perhaps because telling people who they are, how they look, seems cruel in a world where we all seem so crushable, so disposable, so un-special, so regular. From a mental health standpoint they encourage practitioners to enter into these narratives to build a relationship with the client. If you have a new client come in talking about invisible bugs all over their skin, it is not helpful to argue with them about it. They will leave your office and never return. You enter into their world, you discuss the bugs with them, you write your impressions in a file about them, you assess whether their delusions and hallucinations make them a threat to themselves or others. You treat them as a sick person but you do not reveal to them that that is what they are to you.

There was a client who was an adult baby at the clinic. What that meant is that this person who was actually male and in his fifties lived full time as a female baby. Like, what he had everyone call him was “Baby Jessica.” (It wasn’t Jessica, it was another name, duh.) Now, people don’t actually use the word “Baby” as a title when referring to babies, usually. Except if the baby is trapped in a well. But in an adult baby’s life there are lots of contradictions. Babies don’t take blood pressure medication. Babies don’t argue with receptionists over rushing the submission of insurance forms. Babies aren’t assertive about insisting that the staff of their doctors’ office respect their baby identity.

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Bruce Henderson’s Letter to the Lambda Literary Foundation

Originally posted at Alice Domurat Dreger

I have followed the complex history of the conflict between J. Michael Bailey (and now, by extension, Alice Dreger) and certain subsets of the trans communities for many years.  I believe there are things for which Bailey can reasonably be criticized (primarily rhetorical rather than methodological), as does Dreger, and she is honest and straightforward about them in her book.  I also know of the threats made against both of these individuals by their opponents, some of which involved their children, and many of which seemed to verge on the criminal.  It would appear that this is the intellectual “side” your foundation is choosing to take.  I would have advocated taking no side, and either nominating the book on its merits, understanding that such a nomination might raise hackles and, more importantly, support the continuation of the free flow of dialogue and discourse over ideas that are upsetting, even offensive to some, or not nominating it in the first place, had that been the collective wisdom of the judges.  Dreger has a long history of supporting intellectual, sexual, and personal freedom, and has been an advocate for such underrepresented groups as intersex people and conjoined twins.  Whether you agree or disagree with her particular stances should be immaterial, once a panel has decided her book had sufficient merit to be forwarded as a finalist.

And this is where your foundation has failed–and failed miserably and, it would seem, by your own choice, publicly, in ways that I firmly believe will be difficult for you to recover from, at least if you have any interest in the support of scholars and other writers and readers who take intellectual freedom at all seriously.  I can conclude only two possible reasons for the rescinding of the nomination.

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An Open Letter to the Lambda Literary Foundation

Originally posted at Alice Domurat Dreger

When I wondered who might have advocated for the book to receive a Lammy, I am happy to say that so many people I respect came to mind: Jim Marks, Victoria Brownworth, Dan Savage, Anne Lawrence, and others. The more I thought about it, the more finalist status made sense to me. Why should the Foundation, thirteen years after it was harassed unjustly, do anything other than march on without cowardice?

So I joyfully answered the congratulatory email I received from Lambda and started making plans to attend the awards ceremony in New York. Not too surprisingly, Conway and James soon launched a campaign against my book’s finalist status, but I pretty much ignored this. I figured the Foundation knew this would happen and was prepared to weather the storm.

But no. You caved. And quickly—much more quickly than the Foundation did under Marks in 2003. In spite of all the LGBT people who have actively praised my book, who have thanked me for the work, you quickly caved to a small group of bullies who have proven time and time again that they will do anything they can to get attention and to force everyone to adhere to their singular account of transgenderism, even when it negates the reported childhoods of gay and lesbian people, even when it denies the reality of many transgender people and attempts to force them into closets because of their sexual orientations.

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